Australian Army

S-70 BLACKHAWK AND HAMEL GUN

The British designed Light Gun L118 entered service with the British Army in 1974. In 1981, the Australian Army chose the gun to replace its ageing M2A2 howitzers. It was named the Hamel gun and was manufactured under licence in Bendigo, Victoria by by Australian Defence Industries Limited. Australia operates the largest fleet of Blackhawk and Seahawk helicopters outside the USA. The Blackhawk has the power easily to lift both the gun and its crew.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Codes:
A1 Royal Regiment of Australian Artillery Crest
A16 5 Aviation Regiment Badge
A24 Australian Army Aviation Corps Crest

MACK GUN TRACTOR AND 155 mm GUN

The Mack entered service with the Australian Army in 1982. The gun tractor variant features a “kneeling” rear suspension to assist the crew when hooking up the gun trails. An Abbey hydraulic crane is fitted mid-way along the cargo tray. A canvas crew shelter is situated behind the cab. The Mack tows the American M198 155 mm howitzer. It has a range of up to 22 km, or 30 km with rocket assisted rounds. It is also capable of firing laser guided ordnance.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A2 Royal Regiment of Australian Artillery Crest

MERCEDES BENZ UNIMOG AND 105 mm GUN

The Mercedes Benz Unimog U1700L 4 ton truck was manufactured under licence in Victoria. This general service version is being employed as a field artillery tractor for the American M2A2 105mm howitzer. In this role, the canvas tilt is often rolled back to uncover the rear half of the cargo compartment. Although the M2A2 has been replaced in front line service by the Hamel gun, it still performs valuable training and reserve functions.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A3 - Royal Regiment of Australian Artillery Crest

TOYOTA LANDCRUISER

Two hundred and fifteen Toyota model HJ47 long wheelbase Landcruisers were purchased in 1982 by the Army for use by Norforce in Australia’s “Top End”. An important factor behind this one-off purchase was the extensive use of Landcruisers by civilians in the North of Australia, and the subsequent availability of spares on most outback cattle stations. They were modified with roll over protection bars, a light bull bar, modified lighting and long range fuel tanks. When they were replaced in service by the series 110 Land Rover, many Landcruisers were redistributed to other units, such as the Artillery and the RAEME.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Codes:
A4 - The Royal Regiment of Australian Artillery Crest
A14 - The Royal Australian Electrical and Mechanical Engineers Crest

LAND ROVER COMMAND POST

The Land Rover series 110 4×4 GS is the main utility vehicle of the Australian Army, which has been a long-time user of the marque. Land Rovers have formed the bulk of the light tactical fleet for many years. The current series 110 replaces the earlier series 2A and 3. The series 110 differs from its predecessors by having a coil spring suspension. The vehicle depicted here is the command post of a medium artillery battery. It carries a camouflage net and wooden support poles on the roof rack on top of its canvas tilt. All soft top Land Rovers in Australian Army service are fitted with roll over protection bars.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A5 - The Royal Regiment of Australian Artillery Crest

INTERNATIONAL ACCO MkV & 105 mm GUN

The American designed M2A2 105 mm howitzer, which saw service in Vietnam, entered Australian Army service in 1959, replacing the venerable 25 pounder field gun. The International ACCO (Australian Constructed Cab Over) 5 ton truck was an uniquely Australian design. It entered service in 1966, replacing the World War II vintage Studebaker US6 two and a half ton truck. The MkV had a 6 cylinder petrol engine fitted with twin carburettors. An Olding-Garwood winch was fitted amidships. Thirty six years after it was first introduced, a handful are still in service today.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A6 - The Royal Regiment of Australian Artillery Crest

LAND ROVER 6×6 2 TON GS TRUCK

The “Perentie” Land Rover six wheel drive vehicle is an Australian designed stretched version of the series 110 chassis. Apart from six wheel drive, it features a wider track and cab than the standard Land Rover. It is powered by a 3.8 litre, direct injection Isuzu turbo- diesel engine. The drop side aluminium cargo body has a capacity of two tons, and has folding troop seats. Up to fifteen personnel can be carried, 12 in the rear cargo compart-ment and three in the cab. A wide variety of other body configurations can be fitted to the chassis. Many of the body types are interchangeable. Angles of approach and departure are 45 and 31 degrees, respectively, and axle ground clearance is 232 mm.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A7 - The Royal Australian Corps of Transport Crest

MERCEDES UNIMOG 4 TON STORES TRUCK

The Australian Army placed an order in 1981 for 1,295 units, to be assembled in Australia. They were to replace the International ACCO 4×4 two and a half ton trucks. This Mercedes Benz Unimog U1700L has been configured as a stores truck. A set of steps provides easy access to the cargo area via the tailgate. The canvas tilt is in the raised position for greater headroom. The poles carried on top of the canvas tilt are to support the camouflage netting. The “Mog” is powered by a 6 cylinder diesel engine with exhaust gas turbocharger. Portal axles give it an exceptionally high ground clearance.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A8 - The Royal Australian Army Corps of Transport Crest

OKA TWIN CAB GENERAL SERVICE TRUCK

The OKA two ton truck is an uniquely Australian designed four wheel drive vehicle. It is manufactured by the OKA Motor Company Limited in Perth, Western Australia. It has been purchased by some armed forces in the Middle East. It is also operated by the Australian Army and the RAAF in a number of configurations, including crew bus, fire vehicle, radio shelter, 2 ton GS truck, and the twin cab version depicted here. The OKA is popular with its crews when driving in convoys across the vast Australian outback owing to its high level of creature comforts.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Codes:
A9 - The Royal Australian Corps of Transport Crest
A12 - Special Air Service Regiment Badge

LAND ROVER 6×6 AMBULANCE

The “Perentie” Land Rover series 110 six wheel drive truck forms the basis of the Australian Army’s field ambulance fleet.The ambulance is fitted with a fibreglass rear body which can accommodate four stretcher cases or eight seated patients. Two medical orderlies occupy the cab. A large fibreglass storage bin is positioned above the cab. This vehicle is fitted with a self-recovery winch. The rear bodies of all Australian 6×6 Land Rovers (except the SAS Regiment’s Long Range Patrol Vehicle) have common attachment points and are interchangeable.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A10 - The Royal Australian Army Medical Corps Crest

LAND ROVER LRP VEHICLE

The Land Rover six wheel drive two ton chassis has been adapted by the Australian Special Air Service Regiment to serve as an armed long range patrol vehicle. This early version mounts two 7.62 mm general purpose machine guns. Greater fire power is now available with the aft GPMG being replaced by a quick change barrel .50 inch heavy machine gun. A trail bike is carried in a cradle mounted at the rear of the vehicle. The Long Range Patrol Vehicle is purpose-built for deep incursion missions. It can carry sufficient fuel, water, ammunition, rations and equipment to support its crew on long patrols in hostile territory. As such, it continues the Regiment’s long history of using armed Jeeps and Land Rovers to create mayhem behind enemy lines. Long Range Patrol Vehicles are currently on active service with the SASR in Afghanistan.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A11 - Special Air Service Regiment Badge

INTERNATIONAL ACCO 6×6 MEDIUM WRECKER

The International range of trucks was the first series of tactical trucks to be designed and built entirely in Australia. The MkV six wheel drive medium wrecker was powered by a six cylinder, twin carburettor petrol engine. It was fitted with twin boom recovery equipment by Holmes. The International MkV has been replaced in service by the Mercedes Benz Unimog 6×6 medium wrecker.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A13 - The Royal Australian Electrical and Mechanical 
Engineers Crest

ASLAV 25

The ASLAV 25 derives its name from: – “AS”, the NATO designation for Australia; “LAV” for its role as a Light Armoured vehicle, and “25” for the 25 mm calibre of its main armament, the Bushmaster M242 chain gun. The gun elevates from -10 to +60 degrees. Based on the Swiss designed MOWAG Piranha, it is manufactured to Australian specifications by General Motors of Canada and British Aero-space of Adelaide. The ASLAV 25 is amphibious and has two propellers mounted at the rear. A trim vane is erected at the front of the vehicle before entering the water.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A15 – The Royal Australian Armoured Corps Crest

LAND ROVER PARAKEET

The Parakeet mobile satellite communications station is mounted on a Land Rover 6×6 two ton chassis. The system provides secure tactical trunk communications for voice, facsimile and data transmissions between Australian Army formations anywhere in the world.

 

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A17 - The Royal Australian Corps of Signals Crest

IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICE DISPOSAL

The Improvised Explosive Device Disposal special equipment vehicle is a modified Mazda 4×2 commercial vehicle. It is equipped with radio communications, emergency flahing red and blue beacons and sirens. It transports the Australian designed and built “Echidna” remote controlled robot vehicle, comprehensive equipment to deal with improvised explosive devices, and a crew of two explosives specialists.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A18 - The Royal Australian Army Ordnance Corps Crest

IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICE DISPOSAL – AMMUNITION TECHNICIAN

The Echidna remote controlled vehicle can only do so much. Eventually, an explosives specialist must render an improvised explosive device safe. A degree of protection against burns and blast is provided by the Canadian manufactured padded protective suit, helmet and face guard. It takes a great deal of technical knowledge and cold courage to approach an unexploded and potentially unstable lethal device and disarm it.

Aspect: Portrait
Order Code: A19 - The Royal Australian Army Ordnance Corps Crest

MACK 8 TON MEDIUM WRECKER

The Mack 8 ton 6×6 truck entered Australian Army service in 1982. The wrecker version mounts the Holmes A750 twin boom recovery gear. The crew of this vehicle is performing a public service while on exercise by recovering stolen, stripped and wrecked vehicles from Kinglake National Park in Victoria.

 

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A20 - The Royal Australian Electrical & Mechanical 
Engineers Crest

M113A1 ARMOURED PERSONNEL CARRIER

A venerable war horse. M113A1, call sign one-three, was the first Australian and INTERFET armoured fighting vehicle into a devastated East Timor. It was flown into Dili Airport by an RAAF 36 Squadron C130H Hercules, and formed part of 2 RAR Group. It subsequently helped to secure Dili Port to facilitate the landing by sea of 3 RAR. This 30 year old veteran entered service with the Australian Army on 28th April 1972. In addition to East Timor, it has supported Australia’s involvements in Vietnam, Somalia and Rwanda.

Aspect: Portrait
Order Codes:
A21 B Squadron, 3rd / 4th Cavalry Regiment Badge
A22 The Royal Australian Armoured Corps Crest

Pipes and Drums, 5th/7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment

The Royal Australian Regiment is one of only three regular Australian Army Pipe Bands. The unit became fully mechanised in 1984, with the members of the Pipes and Drums Band becoming the crews of the M113A1 Armoured Ambulances. In October 1999, the Pipes and Drums deployed with their vehicles to East Timor as part of the INTERFET force. They again deployed to East Timor in October 2002

Aspect: Portrait 
Order Code: A23 - The 5th/7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment

M113A1 ARMOURED AMBULANCE

Dedicated musicians were formed into military bands in the Renaissance period. Their primary duty was to build morale with martial music as the troops went into battle. However, once battle had been joined, their musical talents were wasted in the din of conflict. Their role then changed to that of stretcher bearers.The M113A1 armoured ambulance is able to afford both the wounded and the medics a degree of protection. Its aluminium armour is proof against 7.62 mm ball ammunition and shell splinters.

Aspect: Landscape 
Order Codes:
A25 5th/7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment Badge
A26 The Royal Australian Armoured Corps Crest
A27 The Royal Australian Infantry Corps Crest
A28 The Royal Australian Army Medical Corps Crest

Drummer, 5th/7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment

The Royal Australian Regiment is one of only three regular Australian Army Pipe Bands. The unit became fully mechanised in 1984, with the members of the Pipes and Drums Band becoming the crews of the M113A1 Armoured Ambulances. In October 1999, the Pipes and Drums deployed with their vehicles to East Timor as part of the INTERFET force. They again deployed to East Timor in October 2002.

 

Aspect: Portrait 
Order Code: A29 - The 5th/7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment

Piper, 5th/7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment

The Royal Australian Regiment is one of only three regular Australian Army Pipe Bands. The unit became fully mechanised in 1984, with the members of the Pipes and Drums Band becoming the crews of the M113A1 Armoured Ambulances. In October 1999, the Pipes and Drums deployed with their vehicles to East Timor as part of the INTERFET force. They again deployed to East Timor in October 2002.

 

Aspect: Portrait 
Order Code: A30 - The 5th/7th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment

161 Reconnaissance Squadron

The 161 Reconnaissance Squadron was formed in June 1965 as 161 Reconnaissance Flight. On 14th September 1965, the Flight departed aboard HMAS Sydney for operations in South Vietnam as part of 1 RAR Battalion Group, attached to the US Army 173rd Airborne Brigade. During its service in Vietnam, 14 Distinguished Flying Crosses, 16 Mentioned in Despatches, a Queen’s Commendation and as an Order of the British Empire were awarded to members of the Flight. Three pilots lost their lives.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A31 - 161 Reconnaissance Squadron

Weapon Locating Radar

The ANTPQ-36 Weapon Locating Radar system is highly accurate, robust and mobile. The equipment is fielded by Brisbane based 131 Locating Battery, whose primary functions are to conduct battlefield surveillance, target acquisition and artillery intelligence. In the counter-battery role, the system can detect enemy mortar and artillery projectiles to a range of about 15 kms, and rocket projectiles to a range of about 24 kms. The ANTPQ-36 system is also located at the School of Artillery at Puckapunyal.

Aspect: Landscape
Order codes: 
A32 (with gunner)
A33 (without gunner)

ASLAV Armoured Ambulance

The ASLAV is based upon the Swiss designed 8×8 MOWAG Piranha, and is manufactured by GM Canada. The APC (Type 2) hull can be configured for various roles using non-permanent Mission Role Installation Kits. The ASLAV-A Armoured Ambulance can carry either three stretcher or six seated patients, in addition to the crew of three. The vehicle is armed with a .50 cal heavy machine gun at the crew commander’s station.

Aspect: Landscape
Order code: 34

ASLAV Armoured Personnel Carrier

The ASLAV is based upon the Swiss designed 8×8 MOWAG Piranha, and is manufactured by GM Canada. The APC (Type 2) hull can be configured for various roles using non-permanent Mission Role Installation Kits. The ASLAV-PC Armoured Personnel Carrier can carry 7 fully equipped soldiers in addition to the crew. The vehicle is armed with a .50 cal heavy machine gun at the crew commander’s station. A remote controlled Behind Armour Commander’s Weapon System is fitted to some vehicles.

Aspect: Landscape
Order Code: A35
Badge: Royal Australian Armoured Corps

Scania 93M Barracks Fire Appliance

The Army Emergency Response Squadron comes under the auspices of the Royal Australian Engineers and was formerly known as the Army Fire Service. Many of Australia’s Army installations have the population of, and are the size of small towns. Consequently, the ERS require civilian style pumpers to protect these installations. The Scania 93M dates from the mid 1990s. The chassis/cab was fitted with its equipment in Adelaide. It is powered by a Scania 8.5 litre, 6 cylinder diesel engine, which drives through an Allison automatic transmission. The pump can deliver 3800L/min at 1000kPa. A monitor, which can provide a stream of water or a fog, is mounted on top of the mid section and can deliver 3000L/min of water or 450 L/min of foam.

Aspect: Landscape
Order code: A36
Badges: Royal Australian Engineers & Army Emergency Response

Mercedes Rural Fire Appliance

The Army Emergency Response Squadron comes under the auspices of the Royal Australian Engineers and was formerly known as the Army Fire Service. The Army requires a bush fire fighting capability, not only to combat Australia’s perennial wild fires, but also to control fires started by the firing of blank and live rounds in training exercises.

 

Aspect: Landscape
Order code: A37
Badges: Royal Australian Engineers & Army Emergency Response

Mercedes Rural Fire Appliance and Bushranger Helicopter Gunship

The Army requires a bush fire fighting capability, not only to combat Australia’s perennial wild fires on Australian Defence Force property, but also to control fires started by the firing of blank and live rounds in training exercises. This Mercedes Rural fire appliance has been in service for almost as long as the Bell UH-1H Iroquois helicopter gunship, known in Australian service as the Bushranger, and continues to this day to support operations from the Army’s Oakey base. Originally flown by the RAAF’s 9 Squadron, it is now operated by 5 Aviation Regiment. The Bushranger is currently being replaced by the AusTiger PAH-2 Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter.

Aspect: Portrait
Order code: A38
Badges (please specify): 
Royal Australian Engineers & Army Fire Service 
Royal Australian Engineers & 5 Aviation Regiment